A Fancy Home Reviews Pastel Colours

Just in case you’ve missed the movement, pastel colours are a big trend in the interior design world right now. Yes, that’s right, it’s time to theme your living room after an ice cream parlour; (which, honestly, we can’t wait for).

In all seriousness, pastel colours seem to be a real divide amongst the interior design world, so we decided to wade in on the discussion, naturally.

Pastel Colours are Cool…

pastel colour: fridge
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Pastel colours are cool; right now, they’re ‘in,’ they’re hip, and they’re trendy. Seen everywhere from clothes to hairstyles, products and even cars – it’s no surprise the trend is all over home décor too.

However, despite the summery connotations of pastel colours, they’re cool toned. The palette pairs perfectly with pale colours like white and cream, which when used as part of an overall theme will create a light and airy feel to a room – especially if there’s ample natural light exposure to the space.

Since pale colours naturally reflect light and brighten a room, cool themes tend to open up space and create a sense of greater capacity. Pastel shades, therefore, are a great choice for amplifying small spaces or adding depth to rooms like kitchens or bedrooms.

Calm…

 

pastel colours: bed sheets
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I think using pastel tones as part of an interior design theme offers understated charm to a room, in a ‘fake nonchalant’ way. Wait, wait, wait, let me explain what I mean. I think pastel colours represent the ‘messy hair’ of interior design, the ‘I didn’t try hard, but I tried really hard to achieve this aloof look’… but for bedrooms, bathrooms and living rooms.

Personally, I really enjoy the muted tones of pastel colours; it makes them multifunctional. Pastel colours are calm and you can pair them with items of bolder colour or for showcasing a pattern; whether that’s a showpiece item of furniture or an accent wall of decorative wallpaper.

Or alternatively, you can use pastels to theme a whole room with matching (or clashing, but we’ll get to that in a minute) ornaments.

pastel colours: vases
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Pastel shades aren’t jazzy or catchy like bold or metallic shades, and they don’t demand to be seen or expect attention; they’re classic, nautical and calm.

… And Collected!

If you’re new to interior design, or simply lack the confidence to clash colours (since clashing colours can be risky); but are wanting to try your hand at the interior design theme favourite, get clashing with pastels. Thanks to the subdued nature you can place them side-by-side, even if they don’t match.

What’s the phrase? Blue and green should never be seen, unless in pastel form.

How to Use Pastel Colours in Your Home

Country style pastel kitchen (1)
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For a long time, pastel tones were associated with baby girl pink and baby blue for boys; pastel colours were only seen in homes if they were linked with a baby or a woman. Until the ’50s and ’60s when a new trend emerged: setting pastel coloured home accessories against bold black or white backgrounds and against contrasting colours to create a striking congruity.

Country

Pastel shades are good for the traditional country kitchen of your dreams. If you’ve got lots of kitchen space, an island and large windows why not give it a homely feel by replacing the cupboard doors with wooden, shaker-style ones that are painted in a soft pastel colour?

DIY Upgrade

pastel diy drawers (1)
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Pastel colours are a favourite for home DIY projects. Why? Because a pastel paint looks good worn down by sandpaper – it’s known as a shabby chic style. The shabby chic style is coincidentally one of the easiest to perfect for a DIY novice, which is why pastel colours are so popular among DIY projects!

Scandinavian Interior Design

The Scandinavian interior design is underpinned by simplistic styles and very light colour palettes. As a result, when Scandinavian homes want to add a splash of colour – or any colour at home – it needs to work with their current light theme and the best way to do that is by using pastel shades. Typically, Scandinavian homes will be whitewashed and perked up with pastel accents.

pastel scandinavian interior (1)
[Photo Credit]

Over-Themed Interior Design

Of course, there are some people who straight-forward love them, which leave us with the last popular pastel lead interior design theme: the over-theme. The over-theme, as we like to call it, is very straightforward – an interior design theme saturated with a pastel palette. Very chic.

pastel interior (1)
[Photo Credit]

The Verdict:

It’s a yes from us. Pastel colours are on-trend and versatile, (and can be easily painted over when you’re ready to redecorate)! If this review has sealed the deal for you, read our article Things You Should Know Before Painting Your Room to ensure the best finish!

How do you feel about pastels? Have you used them before? Let us know your opinion on Facebook and become part of the A Fancy Home community!